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Research Papers

Blister Testing for Adhesion Strength Measurement of Polymer Films Subjected to Environmental Conditions

[+] Author and Article Information
Kenny Mahan, David Rosen

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
University of Maryland,
College Park, MD 20742

Bongtae Han

Fellow ASME
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
University of Maryland,
College Park, MD 20742
e-mail: bthan@umd.edu

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Electronic and Photonic Packaging Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF ELECTRONIC PACKAGING. Manuscript received March 3, 2016; final manuscript received August 14, 2016; published online September 2, 2016. Assoc. Editor: Satish Chaparala.

J. Electron. Packag 138(4), 041003 (Sep 02, 2016) (8 pages) Paper No: EP-16-1046; doi: 10.1115/1.4034454 History: Received March 03, 2016; Revised August 14, 2016

A blister testing procedure combined with a numerical procedure can be used effectively for characterizing the adhesion strength. A challenge arises when it is implemented after subjecting samples to various environmental conditions. The concept of pseudoproperty is introduced to cope with the problem associated with property changes during environmental testing. The pseudoproperty set is determined directly from a deflection versus pressure curve obtained from a typical blister test. A classical energy balance approach is followed to evaluate the energy release rate from the critical pressure and pseudoproperty set. The proposed approach is carried out for an epoxy/copper interface after subjecting samples to full moisture saturation and a high temperature storage condition. In spite of significant change in property, the energy release rates are calculated accurately without extra tests for property measurements.

Copyright © 2016 by ASME
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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Schematic illustration of a blister test

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Fig. 2

Schematic of boundary conditions applied in axisymmetric 2D model of blister test

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Fig. 3

Deflection versus pressure curve for an ideal stretching case; finite element method results and analytical solutions are compared

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Fig. 4

Blister profile before and after a delamination of Δa = 75 μm obtained from the FEA analysis: the case of Fig. 3 with Pcrit = 10 psi

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Fig. 5

G versus Δa plot for numerically determined energy release rate for the case shown in Fig. 4

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Fig. 6

Deflection versus pressure curve for a blister test specimen with an intermediate thickness

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Fig. 7

Deflection versus pressure curve for intermediate case with several pseudomaterial property pairs to fit experimental curve

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Fig. 8

Copper substrates for blister test samples (a) before and (b) after attaching the stencil

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Fig. 9

Schematic of sample preparation procedure: (a) creating temporary plug, (b) creating the predefined area, (c) curing the adhesive, and (d) the final sample ready for testing

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Fig. 10

Schematic diagram of the blister test setup

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Fig. 11

Representative deflection versus pressure curves for an epoxy/copper interface at as-is testing conditions

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Fig. 12

A typical blister sample (a) before and (b) after critical delamination event

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Fig. 13

Representative deflection versus pressure curves for an epoxy/copper sample at three conditions: (a) as-is, (b) after thermal aging, and (c) after moisture degradation

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Fig. 14

Energy release rate comparison of three conditions: (a) as-is, (b) after thermal aging, and (c) after moisture degradation

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Fig. 15

Moduli comparison of three conditions: (a) as-is, (b) after thermal aging, and (c) after moisture degradation

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