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Research Papers

Multiphysics Analysis for Temperature Rise of Electronic Connectors Using a Multiscale Model

[+] Author and Article Information
K.-C. Liao

Associate Professor
Department of Bio-Industrial
Mechatronics Engineering,
National Taiwan University,
No. 1, Sector 4, Roosevelt Road,
Taipei 10617, Taiwan
e-mail: kokki@ntu.edu.tw

H.-L. Lu

Department of Bio-Industrial
Mechatronics Engineering,
National Taiwan University,
No. 1, Sector 4, Roosevelt Road,
Taipei 10617, Taiwan

Contributed by the Electronic and Photonic Packaging Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF ELECTRONIC PACKAGING. Manuscript received March 26, 2015; final manuscript received June 2, 2015; published online June 24, 2015. Assoc. Editor: Satish Chaparala.

J. Electron. Packag 137(3), 031012 (Sep 01, 2015) (7 pages) Paper No: EP-15-1034; doi: 10.1115/1.4030803 History: Received March 26, 2015; Revised June 02, 2015; Online June 24, 2015

Temperature rise could be a crucial issue for some electronic connectors subjected to the relative large electrical current. A nonstatistical multiscale sinusoidal rough surface (MSRS) model is adopted to estimate the contact area between matched metallic terminals as a function of contact load. A fast Fourier transform (FFT) is conducted to characterize the measured surface topology of the terminals. Multiphysics three-dimensional (3D) finite element analysis (FEA) is then carried out to evaluate the temperature rise of mated micro-universal serial bus (USB) connectors. Temperature distributions of the terminal based on the numerical simulations are in good agreement with those based on the measurements using a thermal couple and an infrared thermal camera as well.

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References

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Figures

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Fig. 1

(a) A photograph of the mated micro-USB connector, (b) a computer-aided design (CAD) model of the USB plug connector where the plug terminal is enlarged to show design details, and (c) a CAD model of the USB receptacle connector where the receptacle terminal is enlarged to show design details

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Fig. 2

Relationships between the averaged amplitude and the frequency level of the surface of (a) C5191_P, (b) C5191_R, and (c) C18400_R

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Fig. 3

Schematic drawing of the experimental setup for the temperature measurement of the mated micro-USB connectors

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Fig. 4

Relationships between the calculated ECR based on the MSRS model and contact node numbers in the analysis model

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Fig. 5

(a) Temperature distributions over the mated connectors with C5191_P–C5191_R based on the MSRS model. (b) Detailed temperature variations of the mated terminals inside the plastic housing.

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Fig. 6

(a) Temperature distributions over the mated connectors with C5191_P–C18400_R based on the MSRS model. (b) Detailed temperature variations of the mated terminals inside the plastic housing.

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Fig. 7

Continuous temperature distribution of the part of the mated C5191_P–C18400_R (a) captured by using the infrared thermal camera and (b) based on the MSRS model

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Fig. 8

Temperature distributions over the mated C5191_P–C5191_R based on the conventional approach

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Fig. 9

Temperature distributions over the mated C5191_P–C18400_R based on the conventional approach

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