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Research Papers

A New Analytical Approach for Dynamic Modeling of Passive Multicomponent Cooling Systems

[+] Author and Article Information
A. Gholami, M. Ahmadi

Laboratory for Alternative Energy
Conversion (LAEC),
School of Mechatronic Systems Engineering,
Simon Fraser University,
Surrey, BC V3T 0A3, Canada

M. Bahrami

Laboratory for Alternative Energy
Conversion (LAEC),
School of Mechatronic Systems Engineering,
Simon Fraser University,
Surrey, BC V3T 0A3, Canada
e-mail: mbahrami@sfu.ca

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Electronic and Photonic Packaging Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF ELECTRONIC PACKAGING. Manuscript received January 27, 2014; final manuscript received April 18, 2014; published online May 12, 2014. Assoc. Editor: Gongnan Xie.

J. Electron. Packag 136(3), 031010 (May 12, 2014) (9 pages) Paper No: EP-14-1011; doi: 10.1115/1.4027509 History: Received January 27, 2014; Revised April 18, 2014

A new one-dimensional thermal network modeling approach is proposed that can accurately predict transient/dynamic temperature distribution of passive cooling systems. The present model has applications in variety of electronic, power electronic, photonics, and telecom systems, especially where the system load fluctuates over time. The main components of a cooling system including: heat spreaders, heat pipes, and heat sinks as well as thermal boundary conditions such as natural convection and radiation heat transfer are analyzed, analytically modeled and presented in the form of resistance and capacitance (RC) network blocks. The present model is capable of predicting the transient/dynamic (and steady state) thermal behavior of cooling system with significantly less cost of modeling compared to conventional numerical simulations. Furthermore, the present method takes into account system “thermal inertia” and is capable of capturing thermal lags in various components. The model is presented in two forms: zero-dimensional and one-dimensional which are different in terms of complicacy. A custom-designed test-bed is also built and a comprehensive experimental study is conducted to validate the proposed model. The experimental results show great agreement, less than 4.5% relative difference in comparison with the modeling results.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Left: schematic and block diagram of a typical passive cooling system; right: a modeled passive system test-bed

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Fig. 4

Heat spreaders of the present experimental test setup, sandwiching one heat pipe and one cylindrical electric heater: (a) real geometry, (b) approximated heat spreader geometry, and (c) equivalent thermal resistance network model

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Fig. 5

Thermal resistance network model of heat pipe (steady state)

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Fig. 6

Simplified thermal network model of heat pipe

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Fig. 7

Rectangular finned heat sink and its base rectangular shape equivalent spreader

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Fig. 8

A 0D RC network model of the passive cooling system shown in Fig. 1

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Fig. 3

Schematic of a rectangular spreader with multiple hotspots on the top and bottom surfaces (a) and size and location of the hotspots (b)

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Fig. 2

One-dimensional RC model of the passive cooling system shown in Fig. 1 including: heat source, heat spreader at the heat source, heat pipe, and naturally cooled heat sink

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Fig. 9

(a) Test-bed and (b) schematic of the two-path experimental test-bed

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Fig. 10

One-dimensional model of the two-path experimental test-bed

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Fig. 11

Zero-dimensional model validation with experimental data at three locations of heat sink and two heat sources for the heating scenario of constant 14 W for heater I and 10 W for heater II

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Fig. 12

Zero-dimensional model validation with experimental data at three locations of heat sink and two heat sources for the heating scenario of constant 9 W for heater I and 5 W for heater II

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Fig. 13

Comparison of 0D model with experimental temperature of three different locations on the test-bed for the applied dynamic loading of shown in the figure

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Fig. 14

One-dimensional model validation with experimental data at two heat source locations for the imposed dynamic loading shown

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Fig. 15

Comparison of 0D model with experimental temperature of three different locations on the test-bed for the imposed dynamic loading shown in the figure

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Fig. 16

One-dimensional model validation with experimental data at two heat source locations for the imposed dynamic loading shown in the figure

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