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Research Papers

Performance of Hybrid Fin Heat Sinks for Thermal Control of Light Emitting Diode Lighting Modules

[+] Author and Article Information
Kyoung Joon Kim

Department of Mechanical and
Automotive Engineering,
Pukyong National University,
Busan 608-739, Korea
e-mail: kjkim@pknu.ac.kr

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Electronic and Photonic Packaging Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF ELECTRONIC PACKAGING. Manuscript received June 8, 2013; final manuscript received October 4, 2013; published online November 22, 2013. Assoc. Editor: Mehmet Arik.

J. Electron. Packag 136(1), 011002 (Nov 22, 2013) (7 pages) Paper No: EP-13-1047; doi: 10.1115/1.4025673 History: Received June 08, 2013; Revised October 04, 2013

In this paper we introduce a hybrid fin heat sink (HFH) proposed for the thermal control of light emitting diode (LED) lighting modules. The HFH consists of the array of hybrid fins which are hollow pin fins having internal channels and integrated with plate fins. The thermal performance of the HFH under either natural or forced convection condition is both experimentally and numerically investigated, and then its performance is compared with that of a pin fin heat sink (PFH). The observed maximum discrepancies of the numerical prediction to the measurement for the HFH are 7% and 6% for natural and forced convection conditions. The reasonable discrepancies demonstrate the tight correlation between the numerical prediction and the measurement. The thermal performance of the HFH is found to be 12–14% better than the PFH for the natural convection condition. The better performance might be explained by the enlarged external surface and the internal flow via the channel of the HF. The reference HFH is about 14% lighter than the reference PFH. The better thermal performance and the lighter weight of the HFH show the feasibility as the promising heat sink especially for the thermal control of LED street and flood lighting modules.

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References

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Figures

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Fig. 1

(a) A 3D view of a HFH, (b) the structure of a HF, and (c) a 2D view of a HFH

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Fig. 2

(a) A three-dimensional (3D) view of a PFH, (b) the structure of a pin fin, and (c) a two-dimensional (2D) view of a PFH

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Fig. 3

Boundary conditions for the CFD model of a HFH. A uniform heat flux is applied on the heat sink base. The air flow with a uniform velocity approaches the inlet of the heat sink under a forced convection condition.

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Fig. 4

Temperature fields of air flows near (a) a HFH and (b) a PFH under natural convection, (c) a HFH and (d) a PFH under forced convection with an air velocity of 1 m/s. A heat dissipation of 30 W is applied to all the cases.

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Fig. 5

Temperature fields of (a) a HFH and (b) a PFH under natural convection, (c) a HFH and (d) a PFH under forced convection with an air velocity of 1 m/s. A heat dissipation of 30 W is applied to all the cases.

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Fig. 6

Thermal resistances, Rhsink, of (a) a HFH and (b) a PFH as a function of air velocities, Vair, for various fin spaces at a heat dissipation of 5 W

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Fig. 7

Thermal resistances, Rhsink, of (a) a HFH and (b) a PFH as a function of air velocities, Vair, for various fin spaces at a heat dissipation of 30 W

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Fig. 8

The schematic diagram of a natural convection test rig

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Fig. 9

The schematic diagram of a forced convection test rig

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Fig. 10

Predicted and measured thermal resistances, Rhsink, of a HFH and a PFH under natural convection

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Fig. 11

Predicted and measured thermal resistances, Rhsink, of a HFH and a PFH as a function of air velocities, Vair, under forced convection

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