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Research Papers

Finite Element Analysis for Shock Resistance Evaluation of Cushion-Packaged Multifunction Printer Considering Internal Modules

[+] Author and Article Information
Dae-Geun Cho, Ja-Choon Koo

School of Mechanical Engineering,
Sungkyunkwan University,
2066 Seobu-ro, Jangan-gu, Suwon-si,
Gyeonggi-do 440-746, South Korea

Tae-Gyu Kim

Visual Display Business,
Samsung Electronics,
416 Maetan 3-dong, Yeongtong-gu, Suwon-si,
Gyeonggi-do 443-742, South Korea

Se-Hun Jung

IT Solutions Business,
Samsung Electronics,
416 Maetan 3-dong, Yeongtong-gu, Suwon-si,
Gyeonggi-do 443-742, South Korea

Moon-Ki Kim

School of Mechanical Engineering,
Sungkyunkwan University,
2066 Seobu-ro, Jangan-gu, Suwon-si,
Gyeonggi-do 440-746, South Korea;
SKKU Advanced Institute of Nanotechnology (SAINT),
Sungkyunkwan University, 2066 Seobu-ro,
Jangan-gu, Suwon-si,
Gyeonggi-do 440-746, South Korea

Jae-Boong Choi

School of Mechanical Engineering,
Sungkyunkwan University,
2066 Seobu-ro, Jangan-gu, Suwon-si,
Gyeonggi-do 440-746, South Korea
e-mail: boong33@skku.edu

Damage boundary curves are represented by the graph of the velocity change versus the maximum acceleration, as depicted in Fig. 13. The velocity change is determined by integrating the area under the half-sine-wave shock. The maximum acceleration is the peak value of the acceleration profile. The critical velocity change is the velocity change below which product failure is unaffected by the shock acceleration profile. The critical acceleration is the maximum acceleration level over the critical velocity change, above which product failure occurs.

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Electronic and Photonic Packaging Division of ASME for publication in the Journal of Electronic Packaging. Manuscript received January 14, 2013; final manuscript received May 15, 2013; published online August 7, 2013. Assoc. Editor: Shidong Li.

J. Electron. Packag 135(4), 041001 (Aug 07, 2013) (7 pages) Paper No: EP-13-1004; doi: 10.1115/1.4024748 History: Received January 14, 2013; Revised May 15, 2013

Failures in IT electronics are often caused by falling or external shocks during transportation. These failures cause customers to mistrust the reliability of the products. Many manufacturers of IT electronics have not only used cushioning materials but also increased the shock resistance of their products for failure prevention. Especially in case of printer products, the design of the packaging and the product robustness are extremely important because of their substantial weight and the fragility of the internal modules. For product design, it is essential to understand the impact failure mechanism of the products. In this study, a compression test, a drop impact test, and a finite element analysis (FEA) were performed to analyze the dynamic behaviors of a packaged multifunction printer (MFP). The mechanical properties of a cushioning material were measured by compression tests. The FE models of the cushion packaging and the MFP included the physical characteristics of the internal modules, and their dynamic behaviors were obtained using the commercial software ls-dyna3d. Simulation results were also compared with drop test results to verify the proposed FE models. The shock resistance of the MFP was assessed by stress analysis and strength evaluation. We also expect our FE models will be useful for evaluating the fragility of the internal modules because the models can numerically estimate the shock acceleration profiles of the internal modules, which are difficult to measure experimentally.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Schematic of a drop impact test

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Fig. 2

Normalized peak acceleration data measured in drop impact tests

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Fig. 3

MFP FE model; (a) full MFP model with cushion packaging, (b) printer parts, (c) internal modules, and (d) scanner parts

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Fig. 6

Damping effect for preventing negative volume; (a) nonuse of interior contact condition and (b) use of interior contact condition

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Fig. 7

Node set constraint conditions

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Fig. 8

Global shock acceleration profiles from both experiment and simulation for the downward drop test. Data are acquired every 10 μs.

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Fig. 9

Normalized energy balance for the front drop test

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Fig. 10

Normalized stress distribution of the frame for the left drop test

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Fig. 11

Normalized equivalent stress at location A of the frame

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Fig. 12

Normalized shock accelerations of various internal modules

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