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Research Papers

Promising Technology for Electronic Cooling: Nanofluidic Micro Pulsating Heat Pipes

[+] Author and Article Information
Mohammad Behshad Shafii

e-mail: Behshad@sharif.edu

Zahra Shiee

Center of Excellence in Energy Conversion (CEEC),
School of Mechanical Engineering,
Sharif University of Technology,
P.O. Box 11155-9567, Tehran, Iran

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Electronic and Photonic Packaging Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF ELECTRONIC PACKAGING. Manuscript received July 13, 2012; final manuscript received January 21, 2013; published online March 28, 2013. Assoc. Editor: Siddharth Bhopte.

J. Electron. Packag 135(2), 021005 (Mar 28, 2013) (9 pages) Paper No: EP-12-1070; doi: 10.1115/1.4023847 History: Received July 13, 2012; Revised January 21, 2013

Currently, the thermal management of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) has become a challenge. In the present research, a micro pulsating heat pipe (MPHP) with a hydraulic diameter of 508 μm, is experimented. The thermal performance of the MPHP in both the transient and steady conditions, the effects of the working fluid (water, silver nanofluid, and ferrofluid), heating power (4, 8, 12, 16, 20, 24, and 28 W), charging ratio (20, 40, 60, and 80%), inclination angle (0 deg, 25 deg, 45 deg, 75 deg, and 90 deg relative to horizontal axis), and the application of magnetic field, are investigated and thoroughly discussed. The experimental results show that the optimum charging ratio for water is 40%, while this optimum for nanofluids is 60%. In most of situations, the nanofluid charged MPHPs have a lower thermal resistance relative to the water charged ones. For ferrofluid charged MPHP, the application of a magnetic field substantially reduces the thermal resistance. This study proposes an outstanding technique for the thermal management of electronics.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Photograph of the MPHP

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Fig. 2

Schematic diagram of the experimental setup

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Fig. 3

TEM image of the nanoparticles of the ferrofluid

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Fig. 4

Transient thermal performance of the MPHPs

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Fig. 5

Thermal resistance versus heating power for the 20% charging ratio in the vertical heating mode

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Fig. 6

Thermal resistance as a function of the heat input for the 40% charging ratio in the vertical heating mode

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Fig. 7

Effects of the heating power on the thermal resistance for the 60% charging ratio in the vertical heating mode

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Fig. 8

Thermal resistance versus heating power for the 80% charging ratio in the vertical heating mode

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Fig. 9

Thermal resistance versus heating power for the 20% charging ratio in the horizontal heating mode

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Fig. 10

Thermal resistance versus charging ratio for water as the working fluid

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Fig. 11

Thermal resistance as a function of the charging ratio for the silver nanofluid

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Fig. 12

Effects of the charging ratio on thermal resistance for the case of the ferrofluid as the working fluid

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Fig. 13

Thermal resistance as a function of the inclination angle for various working fluids

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