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Technical Briefs

Thermal Assessment of Naturally Cooled Electronic Enclosures With Rectangular Fins

[+] Author and Article Information
A. Tamayol

Mechatronic Systems Engineering, Laboratory for Alternative Energy Conversion (LAEC), School of Engineering Science,  Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC, V3T0A3, Canadaali_tamayol@sfu.ca

F. McGregor

Mechatronic Systems Engineering, Laboratory for Alternative Energy Conversion (LAEC), School of Engineering Science,  Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC, V3T0A3, Canada

M. Bahrami1

Mechatronic Systems Engineering, Laboratory for Alternative Energy Conversion (LAEC), School of Engineering Science,  Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC, V3T0A3, Canadambahrami@sfu.ca

1

Corresponding author.

J. Electron. Packag 134(3), 034501 (Jul 24, 2012) (6 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4007077 History: Received January 16, 2012; Revised June 11, 2012; Published July 24, 2012; Online July 24, 2012

Passive heat transfer from enclosures with rectangular fins is studied both experimentally and theoretically. Several sample enclosures with various lengths are prepared and tested. To calibrate the thermal measurements and the analyses, enclosures without fins (“bare” enclosures) are also prepared and tested. Surface temperature distribution is determined for various enclosure lengths and heat generation rates. Existing relationships for natural convection and radiation heat transfer are used to calculate the heat transfer rate from the tested samples. The theoretical results successfully predict the trends observed in the experimental data. It is observed that the contribution of the radiation heat transfer is on the order of 50% of the total heat transfer for the tested enclosures. As such, a new correlation is reported for calculating an optimum fin spacing for vertically-mounted uniformly finned surfaces, with rectangular straight fins that takes into account both natural convection and radiation.

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Copyright © 2012 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Schematic of the finned enclosures: (a) cross-section view, (b) isometric view, and (c) an actual enclosure

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Figure 2

Schematic of the bare enclosures without fins: (a) cross-section view, (b) isometric view, and (c) an actual enclosure

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Figure 3

Experimental test bed; (a) schematic, (b) distribution of temperature measuring points and the location of the heater inside the enclosures, (c) actual test bed

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Figure 4

The maximum and the minimum measured temperatures on the surface of the F10 enclosure

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Figure 5

The considered geometry for calculating Fs∞

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Figure 6

Comparison of the experimental data with theoretical predictions for bare enclosures: (a) B10, (b) B12, and (c) B16

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Figure 7

Comparison of the experimental data with theoretical predictions for finned enclosures: (a) F10, (b) F12, and (c) F16

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Figure 8

Contribution of radiation in the overall heat transfer: (a) bare enclosures, (b) finned enclosures

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Figure 9

Effect of fin spacing on conjugate heat transfer from a uniformly finned surface

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