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Research Papers

Absorption Heat Pump/Refrigeration System Utilizing Ionic Liquid and Hydrofluorocarbon Refrigerants

[+] Author and Article Information
Sarah Kim

 School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332

Yoon Jo Kim

Department of Mechanical Engineering,  Washington State University, Vancouver, WA 98686

Yogendra K. Joshi, Andrei G. Fedorov

The George Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering,  Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332

Paul A. Kohl1

 School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332kohl@gatech.edu

1

Corresponding author.

J. Electron. Packag 134(3), 031009 (Jul 23, 2012) (9 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4007111 History: Received March 12, 2012; Revised June 26, 2012; Published July 20, 2012; Online July 23, 2012

The ionic liquid butylmethylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate (bmim)(PF6 ) and five different hydrofluorocarbon refrigerants were investigated as the working fluid pairs for a waste-heat driven absorption heat pump system for possible applications in electronics thermal management. A significant amount of the energy consumed in large electronic systems is used for cooling, resulting in low grade waste heat, which can be used to drive an absorption refrigeration system if a suitable working fluids can be identified. The Redlich–Kwong-type equation of state was used to model the thermodynamic conditions and the binary mixture properties at the corresponding states. The effects of desorber and absorber temperatures, waste-heat quality, and system design on the heat pump performance were investigated. Supporting experiments using R134a/(bmim)(PF6 ) as the working fluid pair were performed. Desorber and absorber outlet temperatures were varied by adjusting the desorber supply power and the coolant temperature at the evaporator inlet, respectively. For an evaporator temperature of 41 °C, which is relevant to electronics cooling applications, the maximum cooling-to-total-energy input was 0.35 with the evaporator cooling capability of 36 W and the desorber outlet temperature in the range of 50 to 110 °C.

Copyright © 2012 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

Schematic diagram of an absorption refrigeration system using IL/refrigerant mixture as a working fluid

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Figure 2

R32 solubility in (bmim)(PF6 ) as a function of temperature (K) and pressure (MPa). Symbols: experimental solubility data [21]; lines: computed EOS model using BIPs.

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Figure 3

R134a solubility in (bmim)(PF6 ) as a function of temperature (K) and pressure (MPa). Symbols: experimental solubility data [21]; lines: computed EOS model using BIPs.

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Figure 4

R125 solubility in (bmim)(PF6 ) as a function of temperature (K) and pressure (MPa). Symbols: experimental solubility data [21]; lines: computed EOS model using BIPs.

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Figure 5

R143a solubility in (bmim)(PF6 ) as a function of temperature (K) and pressure (MPa). Symbols: experimental solubility data [21]; lines: computed EOS model using BIPs.

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Figure 6

R152a solubility in (bmim)(PF6 ) as a function of temperature (K) and pressure (MPa). Symbols: experimental solubility data [21]; lines: computed EOS model using BIPs.

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Figure 7

Experimental test setup for absorption refrigeration system using R134a/(bmim)(PF6 ) mixture as a working fluid

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Figure 8

(a) Absorber microchannel and (b) cover plate with inlet and outlet ports

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Figure 9

Desorber outlet temperature effect on system performance for working fluid (bmim)(PF6 ) and HFC refrigerants. Tc /Te /Ta  = 50/25/35 °C

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Figure 10

Circulation ratio with respect to the refrigerant mass fraction in strong-IL solution

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Figure 11

Desorber outlet temperature effect on efficiency, η, for working fluid (bmim)(PF6 ) and HFC refrigerants. Tc /Te /Ta  = 50/25/35 °C

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Figure 12

Effect of absorber temperature on system performance for working fluid (bmim)(PF6 ) and HFC refrigerants. Tc /Te /Ta  = 50/25/26 °C

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Figure 13

System performance without the solution heat exchanger for working fluid (bmim)(PF6 ) and HFC refrigerants. Tc /Te /Ta  = 50/25/35 °C.

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Figure 14

Experimentally measured (a) CETh and (c) evaporator cooling capacity with respect to the desorber outlet temperature and (b) the relation between the desorber outlet temperature and desorber power input

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Figure 15

Experimentally measured (a) relation between the absorber outlet temperature and the absorber coolant inlet temperature and (b) CETh with respect to the absorber outlet temperature

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