0
Research Papers

Self-Driven Electronic Cooling Based on Thermosyphon Effect of Room Temperature Liquid Metal

[+] Author and Article Information
Peipei Li

 Key Laboratory of Cryogenics, Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190, P. R. China

Jing Liu1

 Key Laboratory of Cryogenics, Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190, P. R. China; Department of Biomedical Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, P. R. Chinajliu@mail.ipc.ac.cn

1

Corresponding author.

J. Electron. Packag. 133(4), 041009 (Dec 09, 2011) (7 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4005297 History: Received May 24, 2011; Revised September 16, 2011; Published December 09, 2011; Online December 09, 2011

Thermal management has been a critical issue for the safe running of an electronic device. Driving liquid metal with low melting point to extract heat from the thermal source is highly efficient because of its superior thermophysical properties over conventional coolant such as water or the like. In this paper, utilizing thermosyphon effect to drive room temperature liquid metal for electronic cooling was proposed for the first time with its technical feasibility demonstrated. This may lead to a self supported cooling which just utilizes the waste heat produced by the hot chip to drive the flow of liquid metal. And the device thus fabricated will be the one without any external pump and moving elements inside. A series of conceptual experiments under different operational conditions were performed to evaluate the cooling performance of the new method. Meanwhile, the results were also compared with that of water cooling by ways of thermal infrared graph and temperatures acquired by thermocouples. According to the measurements, it was found that the cooling performance of liquid metal was much stronger than that of water, and this will become even better with the increase of heat load, and height difference between the cooler and heater. A theoretical thermal resistance model was established and convective heat transfer coefficient was calculated to interpret the phenomenon with uncertainty analyzed. With further improvement of the present system and liquid metal coolant, this method is expected to be flexibly useful for heat dissipation of light-emitting diode (LED) street lamp, desk computer and radio remote unit (RRU), where confined space, efficient cooling, low energy consumption, dust-proof and water-proof are critically requested.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2011 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

Principle (a) and prototype schematic (b) of experimental platform: (1) heat sink; (2) cooler with flow channels; (3) tube; (4) heater with flow channels; and (5) heating block

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

Thermal infrared graph for the system using liquid metal as coolant after the heat source is switched on at the time of (a1) 4 min; (a2) 20 min; (a3) 36 min, and using water as coolant after the heat source is switched on at the time of (b1) 4 min; (b2) 20 min; (b3) 46 min.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 3

Temperature difference between the heat source and ambient using liquid metal and water as coolants when the height difference between the cooler and the heater H is 185 mm

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 4

Temperature of the heat source when the height difference between the cooler and the heater H is 185 mm, 135 mm, 85 mm, respectively, using liquid metal as coolant

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 5

Simplified thermal resistance model of the whole system

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 6

Total thermal resistance of the system using (a) liquid metal and (b) water as coolant when H is 185 mm (TR means thermal resistance)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 7

Convective heat transfer coefficient of liquid metal and water as a function of heat load when H is 185 mm

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 8

Convective heat transfer coefficient of liquid metal as a function of heat load when H is 185 mm, 135 mm, 85 mm

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 9

Heat dissipation percentage by components of the system using liquid metal as coolant when H is 185 mm and heat load is 42.1 W

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 10

Conceptual schematic of the improved system

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In