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Research Papers

Heat Transfer of an IGBT Module Integrated With a Vapor Chamber

[+] Author and Article Information
Xiaoling Yu1

School of Energy and Power Engineering, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049, Chinaxlingyu@yahoo.com.cn

Lianghua Zhang

School of Electrical Engineering, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049, China

Enming Zhou, Quanke Feng

School of Energy and Power Engineering, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049, China

1

Corresponding author.

J. Electron. Packag 133(1), 011008 (Mar 10, 2011) (6 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4003214 History: Received June 03, 2009; Revised May 24, 2010; Published March 10, 2011; Online March 10, 2011

Presently, many methods are adopted to reduce the junction-to-case thermal resistance (Rjc) of insulated-gate bipolar transistor (IGBT) modules in order to increase their power density. One of these approaches is to enhance the heat spreading capability of the base plate (heat spreader) of an IGBT module using a vapor chamber (VC). In this paper, both experimental measurement and thermal modeling are conducted on a VC-based IGBT module and two copper-plate-based IGBT modules. The experimental data show that Rjc of the VC-based IGBT module decreases substantially with the increase in the heat load of the IGBT. Rjc of the VC-based IGBT module is 50% of that of the 3 mm copper-plate-based IGBT module after it saturates at a heat load level of 200W. The transient time of the VC-based IGBT module is also shorter than the copper-plate-based IGBT modules since the VC has higher heat spreading capability. The quicker responses of the VC-based IGBT module to reach its saturated temperature during the start-up can avoid a possible power surge. In the thermal modeling, the vapor is substituted as a solid conductor with extremely high thermal conductivity. Hence, the two-phase flow thermal modeling of the VC is simplified as a one-phase thermal conductive modeling. A thermal circuit model is also built for the VC-based IGBT module. Both the thermal modeling and thermal circuit results match well with the experimental data.

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Copyright © 2011 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

Structure of a typical IGBT module

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Figure 2

Structure of the VC

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Figure 3

Structure of the VC-based IGBT module

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Figure 4

Computational zone of the VC-based IGBT module

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Figure 5

Experiment setup; (a) bottom surface of the VC and (b) top surface of the VC

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Figure 6

Positions of thermocouples: (a) bottom surface of the VC and (b) top surface of the VC

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Figure 7

Temperature distribution of the VC-based IGBT module: (a) bottom surface of the VC and (b) simulated temperature of the module

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Figure 8

IGBT temperature versus vapor thermal conductivity

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Figure 9

Rjc of the three modules varying with the IGBT heat load

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Figure 10

Transient thermal response of the IGBT

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Figure 11

Transient response of the VC-based module

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Figure 12

Thermal circuit of the VC-based module

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Figure 13

Comparisons of the thermal circuit with experimental data

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