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Research Papers

Thermal Conductivity of Diamond-Containing Grease

[+] Author and Article Information
Hung-En Chou

Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Taipei University of Technology, Taipei 106, Taiwan, R.O.C.

Shang-Ray Yang

 Kinik Company, No. 64, Jhongshan Road, Yingge, Taipei County 239, Taiwan, R.O.C.

Sea-Fue Wang1

Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Taipei University of Technology, Taipei 106, Taiwan, R.O.C.sfwang@ntut.edu.tw

James C. Sung

Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Taipei University of Technology, Taipei 106, Taiwan, R.O.C.; Kinik Company, No. 64, Jhongshan Road, Yingge, Taipei County 239, Taiwan, R.O.C.

1

Corresponding author. Present Address: Department of Materials and Mineral Resources Engineering, National Taipei University of Technology 1, Sec. 3, Chung-Hsiao East Road, Taipei, Taiwan, R.O.C.

J. Electron. Packag 132(4), 041015 (Dec 09, 2010) (7 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4003002 History: Received May 18, 2010; Revised October 26, 2010; Published December 09, 2010; Online December 09, 2010

As a thermal interface material, thermal grease (TG) has been extensively applied to facilitate heat dissipation in electronic devices. Despite the superior thermal conductivity of diamond, researches on diamond-containing TGs remain rare. In this study, four kinds of TGs in which diamond served as essential filler were prepared and hot disk technique was applied to measure their thermal conductivity k(TG). After two unoverlapped particle sizes were selected, the volumetric filler content, terminal group, and viscosity of a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) matrix were modified in sequence. Based on the preferred recipe of a single-filler TG, two double-filler TG series were prepared by retaining the large diamonds and replacing the small ones by Al2O3 or ZnO, respectively. Depending on the content, it was found that diamond was not always the best choice for small filler. The highest k(TG), which was 23 times greater than the original k(PDMS), appeared in a ZnO-containing double-filler grease (=3.52W/mK). The prediction for the maximum attainable thermal conductivity was preliminarily supported.

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Figures

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Figure 1

(a) Before placing the TIM, there existed many air gaps on the mating surfaces. (b) After the practical application of the TIM, the air gaps were filled and a continuous layer with a BLT was formed. (c) An ideal TIM is expected to be just thick enough to fill gaps without showing any BLT.

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Figure 2

Thermal paths created within (a) single- and (b) double-sized TG at constant N0 were symbolically sketched

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Figure 3

Variation of k(N0DN1dN2−m50) with N2 (N0=55 or 65)

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Figure 4

Viscosity of hybrid OH-terminated PDMS, prepared by mixing two PDMS (h5000 and h60) in different weight ratios (Wh5000/Wh60)

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Figure 5

k(TG) of two 68D48P20−h∗V series (P=a or d) as a function of V

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Figure 6

k(TG) of three 68DN1PN2−h∗350 series (P=a,d,z) as a function of N2

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Figure 7

Surface SEM images of (a) 68D43z25−h∗350 and (b) 68D43a25−h∗350 after being applied on an ITO substrate

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