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Research Papers

Measurement of Leak Rate for MEMS Vacuum Packaging

[+] Author and Article Information
Zhiyin Gan, Xuefang Wang, Dong Lin

Wuhan National Laboratory of Optoelectronics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 1037 Luoyu Road, Wuhan 430074, China; Institute for Microsystems, School of Mechanical Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074, China

Dexiu Huang

Wuhan National Laboratory of Optoelectronics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 1037 Luoyu Road, Wuhan 430074, China; School of Optoelectronics Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074, China

Sheng Liu

Wuhan National Laboratory of Optoelectronics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 1037 Luoyu Road, Wuhan 430074, China; Institute for Microsystems, School of Mechanical Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074, China; School of Optoelectronics Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074, Chinashengliu63@yahoo.com

J. Electron. Packag 131(4), 041001 (Oct 16, 2009) (6 pages) doi:10.1115/1.3144148 History: Received February 16, 2008; Revised April 06, 2009; Published October 16, 2009

Many Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) devices such as accelerators, gyroscopes, uncooled infrared sensors, etc., require vacuum packaging. The vacuum maintaining lifetime directly determines the vacuum packaging reliability. This research presented a quantitative analysis of the relationship between the leak rate and the vacuum maintaining lifetime, and demonstrated that the leak rate measurement plays an important role. This paper also explored the application limitations in vacuum packaging using a helium spectrometer leak tester to measure the leak rate because the measured leak rate was nonlinear with respect to the actual leak size. According to the fact that the damping coefficient changes with the pressure, a tuning fork crystal chip as a pressure sensor was used to monitor the pressure changes in the package cavity. The leak conductance was also calculated from the pressure tracking data to analyze the leak modes; the molecular flow model and gas desorption model were found to fit the measurement results of leak conductance.

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Copyright © 2009 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 9

Conductance changes with internal pressure

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Figure 10

The model of molecular tube flow leak mode

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Figure 11

Molecular flow leak mode

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Figure 12

The desorption rate by the internal pressure

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Figure 1

The theoretical relationship between the leak size and vacuum maintaining time

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Figure 2

The relationship between the measured leak rate and actual leak size

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Figure 3

Vacuum level testing diagram by tuning fork crystal

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Figure 4

Crystal calibration curve of resonant resistance versus gas pressure

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Figure 5

Vacuum packaged samples by resistance welding

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Figure 6

The pressure tracking of the internal package

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Figure 7

The pressure tracking in the package cavity by time

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Figure 8

The calculated leak conductance with internal pressure from the pressure monitoring data

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