0
Technical Briefs

An Engineering Estimate for Plug-Flow Convection in Porous Media Discarding Fluid Conduction

[+] Author and Article Information
Nihad Dukhan

Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Detroit Mercy, 4001 W. McNichols Road, Detroit, MI 48221nihad.dukhan@udmercy.edu

J. Electron. Packag 131(3), 034501 (Jun 12, 2009) (3 pages) doi:10.1115/1.3143947 History: Received November 21, 2007; Revised February 18, 2009; Published June 12, 2009

Metal and graphite foam are relatively new types of porous materials characterized by having high-solid phase conductivities. In many cooling applications of these materials, including high-power electronics, low-conductivity fluids flow through them, e.g., air. A simple approximate engineering solution for the convection heat transfer inside a two-dimensional rectangular porous media subjected to constant heat flux on one side is presented. The conduction in the fluid is set to zero, and for simplicity, a plug flow is considered. As a result, the non-local-thermal equilibrium equations are significantly simplified and solved. The solid and fluid temperatures decay in what looks like an exponential fashion as the distance from the heated wall increases. The results are in good agreement with one more complex analytical solution in the literature, in the region far from the heated wall only.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2009 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

Schematic of the heat transfer problem

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

Nondimensional solid and fluid temperatures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 3

Comparison to Lee and Vafai (8) for κ=0.01 and various Bi

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In