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Research Papers

Tensile Behaviors of Lead-Containing and Lead-Free Solders at High Strain Rates

[+] Author and Article Information
Fei Qin

College of Mechanical Engineering and Applied Electronics Technology, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 100124, P.R.C.qfei@bjut.edu.cn

Tong An, Na Chen, Jie Bai

College of Mechanical Engineering and Applied Electronics Technology, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 100124, P.R.C.

J. Electron. Packag 131(3), 031001 (Jun 16, 2009) (6 pages) doi:10.1115/1.3144151 History: Received June 19, 2008; Revised March 13, 2009; Published June 16, 2009

Behavior of solder joints in microelectronic packages is crucial to the drop impact reliability design of mobile electronic products. In this paper, tensile behaviors of Sn37Pb, Sn3.5Ag, and Sn3.0Ag0.5Cu at strain rates of 600s1, 1200s1, and 1800s1 were investigated using the split Hopkinson tensile bar experimental technique. Stress-strain curves of the three solders were obtained, and microstructure and fractography of the specimens before and after the tests were examined and presented. The experimental results show that the lead-free solders are strongly strain rate dependent: Their tensile strength, percent elongation, and percent reduction in area are much greater than those properties of the lead-containing solder at high strain rates.

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Copyright © 2009 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Optical micrograph of cross section microstructures of three solders (×500): (a) Sn37Pb, (b) Sn3.5Ag, and (c) Sn3.0Ag0.5Cu

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Figure 2

(a) Specimen and its sizes for the split Hopkinson tensile bar tests, (b) schematic setup of the separated sleeve SHTB testing, and (c) raw signals of the incident and transmitted pulses

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Figure 3

Specimens after the SHTB tests. The two lead-free solders experienced greater plastic deformation before it broke than did the Sn37Pb

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Figure 4

The fractography of the Sn37Pb solder after the SHTB tests at strain rate of 1200 s−1: (a) general view (×25) and (b) high magnification (×900) of the inset square in (a)

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Figure 5

The fractography of the Sn3.5Ag solder after the SHTB tests at strain rate of 1200 s−1: (a) general view (×45) and (b) high magnification (×900) of the inset square in (a)

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Figure 6

The fractography of the Sn3.0Ag0.5Cu solder after the SHTB tests at strain rate of 1200 s−1: (a) general view (×35) and (b) high magnification (×900) of the inset square in (a)

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Figure 7

Tensile true stress-strain curves of three solders at high strain rates. (a) 600 s−1, (b) 1200 s−1, and (c) 1800 s−1

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Figure 8

Mechanical tensile properties of the three solders: (a) the ultimate tensile stress, (b) the percent elongation, and (c) the percent reduction in area

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