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THERMAL ISSUES IN EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES THEORY AND APPLICATIONS, THETA

The Thermal Design of a Next Generation Data Center: A Conceptual Exposition

[+] Author and Article Information
Emad Samadiani, Farrokh Mistree

The G. W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Ferst Drive, Atlanta, GA 30332

Yogendra Joshi

The G. W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Ferst Drive, Atlanta, GA 30332yogendra.joshi@me.gatech.edu

J. Electron. Packag 130(4), 041104 (Nov 13, 2008) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2993151 History: Received September 27, 2007; Revised June 18, 2008; Published November 13, 2008

In the near future, electronic cabinets of data centers will house high performance chips with heat fluxes approaching 100W/cm2 and associated high volumetric heat generation rates. With the power trends in the electronic cabinets indicating 60 kW cabinets in the near future, the current cooling systems of data centers will be insufficient and new solutions will need to be explored. Accordingly, the key issue that merits investigation is identifying and satisfying the needed specifications of the new thermal solutions, considering the design environment of the next generation data centers. Anchoring our work in the open engineering system paradigm, we identify the requirements of the future thermal solutions and explore various design specifications of an ideally open thermal solution for a next generation data center. To approach an open cooling system for the future data centers, the concept of a thermal solution centered on the multiscale (multilevel) nature of the data centers is discussed. The potential of this solution to be open, along with its theoretical advantages compared with the typical air-cooling solutions, is demonstrated through some scenarios. The realization problems and the future research needs are highlighted to achieve a practical open multiscale thermal solution in data centers. Such solution is believed to be both effective and efficient for the next generation data centers.

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Copyright © 2008 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Air-cooled data center with involved scales

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Figure 2

A blade server cabinet with involved scales

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Figure 3

One-fourth of the representative data center as the computational domain (dimensions in meters)

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Figure 4

Temperature profile (in kelvin) at perforated tiles and inlets and outlets of racks with configuration of Case (a)

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Figure 5

Temperature profile (in kelvin) at perforated tiles and inlets and outlets of racks with configuration of Case (b)

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Figure 6

Multiscale water-cooling system

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Figure 7

Unit cell of microchannel heat exchanger as the computational domain (dimensions in millimeters)

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Figure 8

Interscale bridging of analytical results in a typical air-cooled data center

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