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RESEARCH PAPERS

Experimental Study of Pressure Drop and Heat Transfer in a Single-Phase Micropin-Fin Heat Sink

[+] Author and Article Information
Abel Siu-Ho

Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI 96822

Weilin Qu1

Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI 96822qu@hawaii.edu

Frank Pfefferkorn

Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706

1

Corresponding author.

J. Electron. Packag 129(4), 479-487 (May 14, 2007) (9 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2804099 History: Received January 17, 2007; Revised May 14, 2007

The pressure drop and heat transfer characteristics of a single-phase micropin-fin heat sink were investigated experimentally. Fabricated from 110 copper, the heat sink contained an array of 1950 staggered square micropin fins with 200×200μm2 cross section by 670μm height. The ratios of longitudinal pitch and transverse pitch to pin-fin equivalent diameter are equal to 2. De-ionized water was employed as the cooling liquid. A coolant inlet temperature of 25°C, and two heat flux levels, qeff=50Wcm2 and qeff=100Wcm2, defined relative to the platform area of the heat sink, were tested. The inlet Reynolds number ranged from 93 to 634 for qeff=50Wcm2, and from 127 to 634 for qeff=100Wcm2. The measured pressure drop and temperature distribution were used to evaluate average friction factor and local averaged heat transfer coefficient/Nusselt number. Predictions of the previous friction factor and heat transfer correlations that were developed for low Reynolds number (Re<1000) single-phase flow in short pin-fin arrays were compared to the present micropin-fin data. Moores and Joshi’s friction factor correlation (2003, “Effect of Tip Clearance on the Thermal and Hydrodynamic Performance of a Shrouded Pin Fin Array  ,” ASME J. Heat Transfer, 125, pp. 999–1006) was the only one that provided acceptable predictions. Predictions from the other friction factor and heat transfer correlations were significantly different from the experimental data collected in this study. These findings point to the need for further fundamental study of single-phase thermal/fluid transport process in micropin-fin arrays for electronic cooling applications.

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Copyright © 2007 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 12

Comparison of predicted and measured values of local Nusselt number

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Figure 11

Comparison of measured values of Nusselt number from Kosar and Peles (11) and present study

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Figure 10

Local Nusselt number versus Reynolds number

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Figure 9

Local average heat transfer coefficient versus Reynolds number for (a) qeff″=50W∕cm2 and (b) qeff″=100W∕cm2

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Figure 8

Thermocouple readings inside heat sink versus Reynolds number for (a) qeff″=50W∕cm2 and (b) qeff″=100W∕cm2

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Figure 7

Comparison of experimental data and energy balance predictions for water outlet temperature

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Figure 6

Comparison of measured and predicted values of average friction factor

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Figure 5

Variation of average friction factor with Reynolds number

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Figure 4

Variation of measured pressure drop with Reynolds number

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Figure 3

Top view of micropin-fin array and schematic of unit cell

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Figure 2

(a) Test module construction and (b) test module assembly

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Figure 1

Schematic of flow loop

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