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TECHNICAL PAPERS

Strain Rate Dependent Constitutive Model of Multiaxial Ratchetting of 63Sn–37Pb Solder

[+] Author and Article Information
Gang Chen

School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072, P.R. China

Xu Chen1

School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072, P.R. Chinaxchen@tju.edu.cn

Kwang Soo Kim

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 790-784, South Korea

Mohammad Abdel-Karim

Industrial Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering, Cairo University, Fayoum Branch, Fayoum 63111, Egypt

Masao Sakane

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Ritsumeikan University, Shiga 520-8577, Japan

1

Corresponding author.

J. Electron. Packag 129(3), 278-286 (Jul 20, 2006) (9 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2753917 History: Received February 23, 2006; Revised July 20, 2006

A series of multiaxial ratcheting tests were conducted on 63Sn–37Pb solder. A unified viscoplastic constitutive model was developed on the basis of the Ohno–Wang kinematic hardening model, and the rate dependence of the material was taken into consideration by introducing a viscous term. The stress-strain hysteresis loop of 63Sn–37Pb under different strain rates can be simulated reasonably well by the model. However, since the axial ratcheting strain rate of 63Sn–37Pb solder is strongly dependent on the applied shear strain rates in axial/torsional ratcheting, the original constitutive model fails to describe the effect of shear strain rate on the ratcheting strain. To improve the rate sensitivity of the model, the material parameter μi was correlated to the strain rate. Comparisons of the experimental and simulated results verify that the modified constitutive model is able to predict the complicated deformation of 63Sn–37Pb. The effects of axial stress, shear strain range, loading history, and strain rate on ratcheting behavior can be reflected fairly well.

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Copyright © 2007 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Specimen geometry (mm)

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Figure 2

Shear stress versus strain curve for specimen SN41 at different strain rates: (a) experiment and (b) model

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Figure 3

Effect of shear strain rate on the axial ratcheting strain rate: (a) experiment and (b) model

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Figure 4

Shear stress-strain relationship with different μi

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Figure 5

Axial stress versus strain curve for specimen SN50: (a) experiment and (b) modified model

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Figure 6

Axial strain versus cycles for specimen SN50

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Figure 7

Strain response for specimen SN21: (a) experiment and (b) modified model

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Figure 8

Axial strain versus cycles for specimen SN21: (a) experiment and (b) modified model

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Figure 9

Effect of shear strain amplitudes on axial ratcheting rates: (a) experiment and (b) modified model

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Figure 10

Axial strain versus cycles for specimen SN37: (a) experiment and (b) modified model

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Figure 11

Axial strain versus cycles for specimen SN39 and SN40: (a) experiment and (b) modified model

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Figure 12

Effect of axial stress on ratcheting rates: (a) experiment and (b) modified model

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Figure 13

Effect of shear strain rate on the axial ratcheting strain rate: (a) experiment and (b) modified model

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