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RESEARCH PAPERS

Cross-Verification of Thermal Characterization of a Microcooler

[+] Author and Article Information
Zs. Kohári

Department of Electron Devices, Budapest University of Technology & Economics, Goldmann Gy. tér 3., H-1111 Budapest, Hungarykohari@eet.bme.hu

Gy. Bognár

Department of Electron Devices, Budapest University of Technology & Economics, Goldmann Gy. tér 3., H-1111 Budapest, Hungarybognar@eet.bme.hu

Gy. Horváth

Department of Electron Devices, Budapest University of Technology & Economics, Goldmann Gy. tér 3., H-1111 Budapest, Hungaryhorvath@eet.bme.hu

A. Poppe

Department of Electron Devices, Budapest University of Technology & Economics, Goldmann Gy. tér 3., H-1111 Budapest, Hungarypoppe@eet.bme.hu

M. Rencz

Department of Electron Devices, Budapest University of Technology & Economics, Goldmann Gy. tér 3., H-1111 Budapest, Hungaryrencz@eet.bme.hu

V. Székely

Department of Electron Devices, Budapest University of Technology & Economics, Goldmann Gy. tér 3., H-1111 Budapest, Hungaryszekely@eet.bme.hu

J. Electron. Packag 129(2), 167-171 (Feb 15, 2007) (5 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2721089 History: Received December 20, 2005; Revised February 15, 2007

The thermal behavior of a microcooler has been investigated using two different measurement methods to verify their feasibility. On the one hand structure function derived from the thermal measurements was used, while on the other hand, characterization was done with a heat-flux sensor array. The measurement sample was a square nickel plate microcooler holding 128 microchannels in radial arrangement. In our previous studies it was attached to a power transistor which was used as a dissipator and a temperature sensor. The thermal transient response to a dissipation step of the transistor was recorded in the measurement. The measured transients (cooling curves) were transformed into structure functions from which the partial thermal resistance corresponding to the cooling assembly was identified. In the current study the measurement setup was completed by a heat-flux sensor inbetween the dissipator and the microcooler to be able to verify the results extracted via structure functions. In this way we could compare the heat-transfer coefficient (HTC) values obtained from the identified thermal resistances to those calculated directly from the measured heat-flux values. Good matching of the HTC values resulting from the two different methods was found.

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Copyright © 2007 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Photograph of the microchannel plate

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Figure 2

The photo (a) and the cross section (b) of the microcooler attached to a power transistor (BD245C) and the heat-flow sensor inbetween them

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Figure 3

The complete measurement setup

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Figure 4

Concept of the cumulative structure function (see text)

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Figure 5

The differential structure function of the power transistor, microcooler, and its support setup

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Figure 6

Simple lumped thermal model of the DUT shown in Fig. 2

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Figure 7

Change of the thermal resistance with respect to the flowrate

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Figure 8

The heat-flux map of the microcooler at a flowrate of 48L∕h (bold lines indicate the boundaries of the microcooler on the sensor array)

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Figure 9

The heat-flux map of the microcooler at a flow rate of 120L∕h

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Figure 10

The thermal conductance of the microcooler only

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Figure 11

Heat transfer coefficient of the microcooler

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