0
RESEARCH PAPERS

Heightened Thermal Convection as a Result of Splitting a Square Cavity Diagonally in Half

[+] Author and Article Information
El Hassan Ridouane1

Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Vermont, 201 Votey, 33 Colchester Avenue, Burlington, Vermont 05405eridouan@cems.uvm.edu

Antonio Campo

Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Vermont, 201 Votey, 33 Colchester Avenue, Burlington, Vermont 05405

1

Corresponding author.

J. Electron. Packag 128(3), 251-258 (Aug 09, 2005) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2229224 History: Received May 04, 2005; Revised August 09, 2005

This investigation addresses the thermogeometric performance of a two-square cavity system contrasted against a two-isosceles triangular cavity system, with an exactly equal heating segment and comparable cooling segment. When one square cavity is cut diagonally in half, it results in a pair of isosceles triangular cavities. The isosceles triangular cavity on the left is heated from the left vertical wall, the top wall is insulated, and the inclined wall is cold; the so-called HIC triangular cavity. The isosceles triangular cavity on the right is heated from the right vertical wall, the bottom wall is insulated, and the inclined wall is cold; the so-called HCI triangular cavity. It may be speculated that the two-isosceles triangular cavity system may find application in the miniaturization of electronic packaging severely constrained by space and/or weight. The finite volume method, accounting for temperature-dependent thermophysical properties of air, is employed to perform the computational analysis. Representative height-based Rayleigh numbers assume values up to 106 to avoid oscillations that occur at a Rayleigh number between RaH=2×106 and 2.2×106. Numerical results are reported for the velocity field, the temperature field, and the local and the mean convective coefficient along the heated vertical wall. Under a dominant conduction condition for RaH=103, the heat flux across the derived two-isosceles triangular system is 334% higher than its counterpart across the original two-square system. In contrast, for a dominant convection condition for RaH=106, this margin diminishes to 20%, but still constitutes a significant improvement. For the design of two-triangular cavity systems, a NuH correlation equation has been constructed yielding a maximum error of 2% at RaH=104.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2006 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

Sketch of: (a) A two-square cavity system, and (b) a derived two-isosceles triangular cavity system

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

Comparison between the numerical and experimental mean Nusselt numbers for summer (Cases 1) and winter (Case 2) conditions

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 3

Plots of stream functions and isotherms for the square and isosceles triangular cavities sharing a low RaH=103

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 4

Plots of stream functions and isotherms for the square and isosceles triangular cavities sharing a high RaH=106

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 5

Variation of the local Nusselt number Nuy along the hot vertical wall of the square and isosceles triangular cavities for: (a) A low RaH=103 and (b) a high RaH=106

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 6

Influence of Rayleigh number RaH on the mean Nusselt number NuH for the two-square cavity system and the two-isosceles triangular cavity system for 103⩽RaH⩽106

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In