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RESEARCH PAPERS

Investigation of Flow and Heat Transfer of an Impinging Jet in a Cross-Flow For Cooling of a Heated Cube

[+] Author and Article Information
D. Rundström

Division of Energy and Mechanical Engineering, Department of Technology and Build Environment University of Gävle Gävle, Sweden and Department of Mechanical Engineering, Linköping University, Linköping, Swedendrm@hig.se

B. Moshfegh

Division of Energy and Mechanical Engineering, Department of Technology and Build Environment University of Gävle Gävle, Sweden and Department of Mechanical Engineering, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden

J. Electron. Packag 128(2), 150-156 (Nov 30, 2005) (7 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2188948 History: Received November 11, 2004; Revised November 30, 2005

The current trends toward the greater functionality of electronic devices are resulting in a steady increase in the amount of heat dissipated from electronic components. Forced channel flow is frequently used to remove heat at the walls of the channel where a PCB with a few high heat dissipating components is located. The overall cooling strategy thus must not only match the overall power dissipation load, but also address the requirements of the “hot” components. In order to cool the thermal load with forced channel flow, excessive flow rates will be required. The objective of this study is to investigate if targeted cooling systems, i.e., an impinging jet in combination with a low velocity channel flow, can improve the thermal performance of the system. The steady-state three-dimensional (3-D) model is developed with the Reynolds-Stress-Model (RSM) as a turbulence model. The geometrical case is a channel with a heated cube in the middle of the base plate and two inlets, one horizontal channel flow, and one vertical impinging jet. The numerical model is validated against experimental data obtained from three well-known cases, two cases with an impinging jet on a flat heated plate, and one case with a heated cube in a single channel flow. The effects of the jet Re and jet to-cross-flow velocity ratio are investigated. The airflow pattern around the cube and the surface temperature of the cube as well as the mean values and local distributions of the heat transfer coefficient are presented.

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Copyright © 2004 by IEEE
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Figures

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Figure 2

Computational grid in the xz plane, y∕h=0.5

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Figure 3

Computational grid in the xy plane, z∕h=2

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Figure 4

Computational domain

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Figure 5

Definition of the path lines at the cube

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Figure 6

Temperature distribution over the cube in the xy plane, z∕h=2

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Figure 7

Temperature distribution over the cube in the xz plane, y∕h=0.5

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Figure 8

Contours of velocity magnitude in the xy plane, z∕h=2, velocity ratio Uj∕Uc=6.0∕2.3

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Figure 9

Contours of velocity magnitude in the xz plane, y∕h=0.5, velocity ratio Uj/Uc = 6.0/2.3

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Figure 10

Contours of velocity magnitude in the xz plane, y∕h=4∕3, velocity ratio Uj/Uc = 6.0/2.3

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Figure 11

Contours of surface temperature at the rear face and at the top of the cube

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Figure 12

Contours of surface temperature at the sidewalls and at the top of the cube

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Figure 13

Average heat transfer coefficient h¯ on the sides and the average value of all sides of the cube

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Figure 1

Computational domain and a schematic sketch of the heated cube

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