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RESEARCH PAPERS

Interfacial Thermal Stresses in Trilayer Assemblies

[+] Author and Article Information
H. R. Ghorbani

Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering,  University of Toronto, 5 King’s College Road, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5S 3G8

J. K. Spelt1

Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering,  University of Toronto, 5 King’s College Road, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5S 3G8

In this paper, models that provide zero shear stress at the interfacial boundaries are called “nonlocal,” whereas those that do not meet this requirement are called “local.”

Note that + and signs in the (±) refer to the divisions in the left and right side of i=(n+1)2, respectively.

1

Corresponding author.

J. Electron. Packag 127(3), 314-323 (Nov 24, 2004) (10 pages) doi:10.1115/1.1938205 History: Received April 15, 2004; Revised November 24, 2004

A two-dimensional model has been developed for the interfacial thermal stresses in short and long trilayer assemblies under both plane stress and plane strain conditions. Interfacial stresses are approximated using a combination of exact elasticity solutions and elementary strength of materials theories. Governing differential equations are linearized through a finite difference discretization procedure. The conditions of zero shear stress at the free edges and self-equilibrated peel stresses are satisfied. The approach is mathematically straightforward, can be extended to include inelastic behavior, and can be adapted to problems involving external loads and a variety of geometries. The results have been compared to available data in the literature and finite element analysis.

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Copyright © 2005 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Internal forces and moments in a trilayer assembly due to uniform temperature change

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Figure 2

Interfacial shear stresses in example 1

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Figure 3

Interfacial peel stresses in example 1

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Figure 4

Interfacial shear stresses in example 2

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Figure 5

Interfacial peel stresses in example 2

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Figure 6

Horizontal deformation of the upper surface of a long, thin strip subject to shear stress on top

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Figure 7

Two-dimensional rectangular body subject to antisymmetric shear stress on top

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