0
RESEARCH PAPERS

Transient Thermomechanical Simulation of Laser Hammering in Optoelectronic Package Manufacturing

[+] Author and Article Information
Ben Ting

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tufts University, Medford, MA 02155

Vincent P. Manno

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tufts University, Medford, MA 02155Vincent.Manno@tufts.edu

J. Electron. Packag 127(3), 299-305 (Nov 01, 2004) (7 pages) doi:10.1115/1.1938206 History: Received January 28, 2004; Revised November 01, 2004

Laser hammering (LH) is a process used in the manufacturing of butterfly optoelectronic packages to correct laser-to-fiber misalignment that occurs when the semiconductor lasers are welded in place. High-power, precisely positioned pulsed lasers are used in LH to induce deformation of the fiber support housing to, in turn, induce realignment. A thermomechanical modeling study of LH is reported in this paper, which focuses on the degree to which a steady-state model can predict the asymptotic state of a transient response subjected to a periodic laser excitation. A baseline, two-dimensional fiber mounting/ferrule geometry is employed in a finite element analysis simulation case study. Various laser wave forms are applied to focus spot location sizes of 50 and 200μm over a range of applied heat fluxes (101000Wmm2). Effects of laser energy deposition location, as well as the use of multiple lasers, are also studied. The results show that the steady-state solution is in good agreement with the asymptotic transient response for horizontal fiber displacement and fiber temperature. The laser focus spot surface temperature predictions are also found to be in reasonable agreement. However, the vertical fiber displacement tends to be overpredicted by the steady-state solution, sometimes by as much as an order of magnitude. The causes, both physical and computational, of this disagreement are discussed.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2005 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 6

Thermal and mechanical boundary condition schematic

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 7

Thermomechanical response during first pulse of single-laser, 200μm FSL case

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 8

Comparison of steady-state and transient model predictions of center fiber temperature for single-laser, 200μm FSL case

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 9

Comparison of SS and ATR of FSL temperature for single-laser, 200μm FSL case

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 10

Comparison of SS and ATR fiber position predictions for single-laser, 200μm FSL case

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

Schematic of laser diode and fiber/ferrule coupling within an optoelectronic package (idealized 2D cross section on the right)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

Typical optical transfer efficiency curve (2)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 3

Possible feedback control loop for post weld shift (PWS) realignment

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 4

Single laser beam, 50μm FSL baseline model geometry

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 5

Finite element mesh of the model (left) and fiber region (right)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 11

Thermal and displacement field predictions for dual-laser, high-power (375W∕mm2-avg, 1000W∕mm2-peak), 200μm FSL case (ATR results at the extreme conditions of the limit cycle)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 12

Comparison of SS and ATR fiber position predictions for dual-laser, high-power (375W∕mm2-avg, 1000W∕mm2-peak), 200μm FSL case

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 13

ATR fiber position predictions for single-laser, 200μm FSL case using material properties evaluated at 298 and 600K

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 14

von Mises stress fields at 1.2s for single-laser, 200μm FSL case using material properties evaluated at 298 and 600K (peak stress contour–680MPa)

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In