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ADDITIONAL TECHNICAL PAPERS

Transient Thermal Management of a Handset Using Phase Change Material (PCM)

[+] Author and Article Information
Marc Hodes, Lou Manzione, Calvin Chen

Bell Laboratories, Lucent Technologies, Murray Hill, NJ 07974

Randy D. Weinstein, Stephen J. Pence, Jason M. Piccini

Chemical Engineering Department, Villanova University, Villanova, PA 19085

J. Electron. Packag 124(4), 419-426 (Dec 12, 2002) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.1523061 History: Received September 13, 2000; Revised October 05, 2001; Online December 12, 2002
Copyright © 2002 by ASME
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References

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Figures

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Photograph of exploded view of handset showing Al PCM container attached to FR-4 board and five thermocouples measuring PCM temperatures. Also visible are thermocouple and power leads to heater and detachable rails on the ABS case for thermocouple egression.
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Schematic of the RHS of the handset mock-up in its vertical orientation. Dimensions are in centimeters unless otherwise noted and drawing is to scale. (Detachable rails to accommodate thermocouples are not shown.)
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Steady-state thermal images of vertically oriented handset with Thermasorb-122 as the PCM and 3 W of power supplied
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Thermal images of the front side of the vertically oriented handset as a function of time during heating with 3 W of power supplied and the PCM absent, Thermasorb-122 and tricosane, respectively. Temperature scale is the same as shown in Fig. 3.
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Average ΔTPCM−∞ when the PCM is absent, Thermasorb-122, and tricosane with 3 W of power supplied to the vertically oriented handset
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Average ΔTPCM−∞ when the PCM is absent, Thermasorb-122, and tricosane during cooling. (Initial conditions are the steady-state conditions from Fig. 5.)
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Average ΔTPCM−∞ when the PCM is tricosane with various powers supplied to the vertically oriented handset
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Power versus time required to A) melt tricosane B) melt tricosane and increase its temperature by 40°C, C) melt tricosane and increase its temperature and that of the entire handset 40°C, and D) melt tricosane and increase the temperature of the tricosane, Al PCM container, 1/3 of the ABS case and 1/3 of the FR-4 by 40°C. (Calculations were done assuming zero heat transfer to the ambient.)
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Outline of Fluent® mesh. Gravity is in the–Z direction and all body elements and selected surface elements are not shown for clarity
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Calculated transient heat transfer rates (radiation and natural convection) from the vertically oriented handset when Thermasorb-122 is the PCM. Heater power equals 3 W for the first 90 min and 0 W thereafter.
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Calculated transient heat transfer rates (radiation and natural convection) from the five relevant sides of the vertically oriented handset to the ambient when Thermasorb-122 is the PCM. Heater power equals 3 W for the first 90 minutes and 0 W thereafter.

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