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Research Papers

An Investigation of Flat-Plate Oscillating Heat Pipes

[+] Author and Article Information
Peng Cheng, Joe Boswell

 ThermAvant Technologies, Columbia, MO 65201

Scott Thompson

Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Missouri—Columbia, Columbia, MO 65201

H. B. Ma1

Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Missouri—Columbia, Columbia, MO 65201mah@missouri.edu

1

Corresponding author.

J. Electron. Packag 132(4), 041009 (Nov 24, 2010) (6 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4002726 History: Received April 06, 2010; Revised July 31, 2010; Published November 24, 2010; Online November 24, 2010

The heat transfer performance of flat-plate oscillating heat pipes (FP-OHPs) was investigated experimentally and theoretically. Two layers of channels were created by machining grooves on both sides of a copper plate in order to increase the channel number per unit volume. The channels had rectangular cross-sections with hydraulic diameters ranging from 0.762 mm to 1.389 mm. Acetone, water, diamond/acetone, gold/water, and diamond/water nanofluids were tested as working fluids. It was found that the FP-OHP’s thermal resistance depended on the power input and operating temperature. The FP-OHP charged with 0.0003 vol % gold/water nanofluids achieved a thermal resistance of 0.078 K/W while removing 560 W with a heat flux of 86.8W/cm2. The thermal resistance was further decreased when the nanofluid was used as the working fluid. A mathematical model predicting the heat transfer performance was developed to predict the thermal performance of the FP-OHP. Results presented here will assist in the optimization of the FP-OHP and provide a better understanding of heat transfer mechanisms occurring in OHPs.

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Copyright © 2010 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

3D FP-OHP configurations

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Figure 2

Schematic of experimental setup

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Figure 3

Thermal resistance versus power for Nos. 1 and 2 with at 60°C operating temperature

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Figure 4

Thermal conductivity versus power for Nos. 1 and 2 with at 60°C operating temperature

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Figure 5

Thermal resistance versus power for No. 3 at 20°C operating temperature

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Figure 6

Thermal resistance versus power for No. 4 at 20°C operating temperature

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Figure 7

Thermal resistance versus power for No. 3 at 60°C operating temperature

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Figure 8

Comparison between experimental data and model (No. 3, water, 20°C, and 60°C)

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